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Using modular architectures within distributed learning environments : a means for improving the efficiency of instructional design & development processes

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Using modular architectures within distributed learning environments : a means for improving the efficiency of instructional design & development processes

Cholmsky, Paul (2001) Using modular architectures within distributed learning environments : a means for improving the efficiency of instructional design & development processes. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

In addition to reducing costs associated with system development, modular architectures provide large-scale distributed learning environments with the flexibility required to meet the diverse needs of a global audience. Comprehensive standards for implementing such architectures are now being developed by several organizations. In order to take full advantage of these standards, instructional content design and development processes may need to be modified. The first part of the thesis investigates the foundations of computer-based learning environments, and the historical development of instructional design methodologies in this domain. Specific emphasis is placed on the human factors involved in formalizing a design process, and how the concept of systematicity in design may evolve in the context of complex learning systems. Modular architectures are presented as a technique for ameliorating the complexity of design in this domain. The second part of the thesis examines and critiques a recently-proposed standardized data model for distributed assessment systems. The concept of a distributed computer-based assessment system is first briefly defined. This is followed by an identification of the drivers underlying the need for a standardized data model, and a discussion of what constitutes a suitable methodology for evaluating such a standard in advance of its field implementation. After outlining the structural and functional aspects of the candidate standard, the IMS Question & Test Interoperability Information Model (Smythe & Shephed, 2000), the merits and failings of the standard are discussed, and a set of recommendations for the evolution of the standard is made.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Education
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Cholmsky, Paul
Pagination:viii, 143 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Education
Date:2001
Thesis Supervisor(s):Abrami, Philip C.
ID Code:1388
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:18
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:20
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