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Beyond supply and scarcity : an examination of energy systems, externalities, and the move toward renewable resources

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Beyond supply and scarcity : an examination of energy systems, externalities, and the move toward renewable resources

Pretli, Dwayne G (2002) Beyond supply and scarcity : an examination of energy systems, externalities, and the move toward renewable resources. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

This thesis begins with an examination of the various multifaceted issues facing human energy use, illustrating the contention that the theoretical framework upon which modern energy studies are built must be expanded. Accordingly, it is maintained that a comprehensive study of modern energy systems and, similarly, modern energy use, which employs more than the standard one-dimensional analysis technique, will help to explore many currently overlooked problems, as well as the interconnected foundations of these same problems. Consequently, it is argued that any attempt to develop policies pertaining to the notion of social development, when maintaining a focus on energy use, must begin from this starting point. The primary goals of this thesis are, therefore, to simply: (1) depict the manner in which most contemporary energy studies perpetuate a limited understanding of energy use; (2) elaborate upon how this understanding can be expanded, within the context of a discussion of the evaluation of the concept of sustainable development; (3) discuss the consequences of this in terms of fossil fuel use; (4) point to how alternatives solutions may, in fact, be reached. The central argument is that a shift in global energy systems is not only possible and desirable, but may well be inevitable.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Political Science
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Pretli, Dwayne G
Pagination:viii, 143 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Political Science
Date:2002
Thesis Supervisor(s):Stoett, Peter
ID Code:1669
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:21
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:22
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