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Novelty preference in rats : global cerebral ischemia versus cytotoxic lesions of the hippocampus

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Novelty preference in rats : global cerebral ischemia versus cytotoxic lesions of the hippocampus

Gaskin, Stephane (2002) Novelty preference in rats : global cerebral ischemia versus cytotoxic lesions of the hippocampus. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Rats have a natural tendency to spend more time exploring novel objects than familiar objects, and this preference can be used as an index of object-recognition memory. Rats also show an exploratory preference for objects in locations where they have not previously encountered objects (an index of place memory), and for familiar objects in contexts different from those in which the objects were originally encountered (an index of context memory). In Experiment 1, rats were subjected to either 10 minutes of global-cerebral-ischemia (ischemia)--which resulted in significant neuropathology in the hippocampus with no observable damage to other areas--or sham ischemia. Rats were then tested on all three versions of the novelty-preference paradigm (NPP), with retention intervals, between the familiarization and test phases, of either 5 minutes or 24 hours. Both ischemic and sham rats displayed a novelty preference on all three trial types when the retention interval was 5 minutes. Rats that received sham surgery, but not ischemic rats, displayed this preference on OBJECT and PLACE trials with a 24-hour interval. Rats that received sham surgeries displayed a novelty preference. Neither group discriminated between objects on CONTEXT trials with a 24-hour interval. In Experiment 2, rats with cytotoxic lesions of the hippocampal formation were tested on the OBJECT version of the NPP with retention intervals of either 15 minutes or 24 hours. Both sham and rats with hippocampal ablation discriminated between novel and familiar objects in both delay conditions. The combined findings of these two experiments suggest that object-recognition deficits following ischemia are not due to hippocampal damage.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Gaskin, Stephane
Pagination:ix, 104 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Psychology
Date:2002
Thesis Supervisor(s):Mumby, David G
ID Code:1891
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:23
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:23
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