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Stress@work : an exploration of the impact of information and communication technology on Canadian workers

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Stress@work : an exploration of the impact of information and communication technology on Canadian workers

Howard, Dorothy Zalcman (2003) Stress@work : an exploration of the impact of information and communication technology on Canadian workers. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Although many assumptions have been made about the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on worklife, research on human concerns and human resource issues in a variety of settings, sectors, and occupational groups is surprisingly limited. The literature suggests that while new technologies may offer many benefits, they may also contribute to increased job stress and strain. This thesis is a multiple exploratory case study examining the ways in which office technologies contribute to job stress and burnout among executives, professionals, and clerical-administrative workers in the not-for-profit sector. A conceptual model drawing on the demand-control model of job stress and the job-person fit model of burnout was developed and empirically tested. Data were collected in six organizations and triangulated in 18 semi-structured, in-depth interviews, documentation, and on-site observation. The study found that ICT contributes to job stress by creating new expectations that exacerbate workload, reduce control, and contribute to community breakdown. The conditioning effects of training and values were also explored. Managers, an understudied group, reported the highest levels of stress and strain. Limitations of the study and suggestions for further research are discussed.

Divisions:Concordia University > John Molson School of Business
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Howard, Dorothy Zalcman
Pagination:vii, 148 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.Sc.Admin.)
Program:John Molson School of Business
Date:2003
Thesis Supervisor(s):Dyer, Linda
ID Code:2371
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:27
Last Modified:14 Dec 2012 16:39
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