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Maternal childhood risk status as a predictor of emotional availability and physical contact in mother-child interactions : an intergenerational study

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Maternal childhood risk status as a predictor of emotional availability and physical contact in mother-child interactions : an intergenerational study

Bentley, Vivianne M. N (1997) Maternal childhood risk status as a predictor of emotional availability and physical contact in mother-child interactions : an intergenerational study. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

The present study examined the quality of mother-child interactions in a sample of mothers with a history of childhood aggression and social withdrawal, and their at-risk children. The relationship between maternal childhood risk status, maternal scaffolding and child developmental competence was also examined. Participants were recruited from the subjects making up the Concordia Risk Project, which commenced in 1977 when children in Grades 1, 4, or 7, from low SES, inner-city neighbourhoods, were classified along the dimensions of aggression and social withdrawal. Interactions of 42 mothers and their children aged 13 to 42 months were videotaped in their homes during a 15 minute free play session. Quality of mother-child interactions was assessed using the Emotional Availability Scales (Biringen & Robinson, 1991). Quality and quantity of physical contact were also coded. Child developmental status was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (Second Edition, Bayley, 1993). Findings lent partial support for the prediction that the quality of mother-child interactions in the next generation would be disrupted by maternal risk status. Mothers with higher levels of childhood aggression and social withdrawal were more likely to demonstrate hostile behaviours in interactions with their children. Mothers' risk status did not predict child developmental status or physical contact. Consistent with previous research findings, both maternal education and maternal scaffolding were important in the prediction of child developmental status. Moreover, the child's age was an important predictor of child responsiveness and physical contact. The findings have implications for understanding the processes by which maternal childhood psychosocial functioning may represent a risk for the next generation

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Bentley, Vivianne M. N
Pagination:xi, 151 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Psychology
Date:1997
Thesis Supervisor(s):Stack, Dale M
ID Code:291
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:10
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:13
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