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The lateral hypothalamus and energy balance : facilitation and inhibition of perifornical self-stimulation by long- and short-term metabolic signals

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The lateral hypothalamus and energy balance : facilitation and inhibition of perifornical self-stimulation by long- and short-term metabolic signals

Fulton, Stephanie E (1998) The lateral hypothalamus and energy balance : facilitation and inhibition of perifornical self-stimulation by long- and short-term metabolic signals. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Electrical stimulation of certain brain areas produces a robust effect that directs the animal towards obtaining more stimulation. This phenomenon is believed to result from the activation of neural circuits that direct the animal towards naturally-occurring reinforcers such as food. The lateral hypothalamus (LH) is considered a particularly good site for obtaining vigorous self-stimulation in rats. There is evidence that chronic food restriction enhances the reward value of LH electrical stimulation when the electrode is positioned in the perifornical region. The objective of the present work was to characterize the forward circuitry activated by perifornical stimulation by examining the effects of long- and short-term energy balance manipulations within the same subjects. In this regards, Experiment 1 was carried out to replicate the findings that chronic food restriction facilitates perifornical self-stimulation. Experiment 2 was carried out to investigate the effect of a 48 hour period of food derivation on self-stimulation. To examine whether leptin signaling is involved in the process whereby food restriction enhances the rewarding effect of the perifornical stimulation the effect of an intraventricular infusion of leptin on self-stimulation was tested in Experiment 3.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Fulton, Stephanie E
Pagination:xi, 124 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Psychology
Date:1998
Thesis Supervisor(s):Shizgal, Peter
ID Code:656
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:13
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:15
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