Breadcrumb

 
 

Pathogenicity of the hymenolepidid cestode Microsomacanthus hopkinsi in its intermediate host, Hyalella azteca: implications for transmission, host fitness, and host populations

Title:

Pathogenicity of the hymenolepidid cestode Microsomacanthus hopkinsi in its intermediate host, Hyalella azteca: implications for transmission, host fitness, and host populations

Kokkotis, T. and McLaughlin, J. Daniel (2006) Pathogenicity of the hymenolepidid cestode Microsomacanthus hopkinsi in its intermediate host, Hyalella azteca: implications for transmission, host fitness, and host populations. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 84 (1). pp. 32-41. ISSN 0008-4301

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
107Kb

Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/Z05-173

Abstract

Infection by larval parasites can have severe consequences on intermediate hosts that affect transmission, fecundity and fitness of the host, and host population structure. This study examines the pathogenic effects of cysticercoid larvae of the hymenolepidid cestode Microsomacanthus hopkinsi (Schiller, 1951) on its amphipod intermediate host, Hyalella azteca Saussure, 1858. There was a significant, positive relationship between oncosphere consumption, cysticercoid burden, and age in short-term experiments in which groups of H. azteca were exposed individually to single egg packets of M. hopkinsi during instars 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 9; however, there was no correlation between oncosphere consumption and the intensity of infection in the amphipod hosts within each instar. The mean number of moults over a 14 day experimental period was significantly less in infected amphipods than in their respective controls. In short-term experiments, the greatest mortality appeared to be limited to amphipods exposed during the earliest instars; little mortality was observed in amphipods exposed during instar 4 or later. Long-term experiments revealed a significant negative effect of infection on the overall life span of both male and female H. azteca exposed individually to a single egg packet during instar 4. Of 72 females infected during instar 4 and provided with mates during instar 6, only 1 and 4 produced broods in instars 8 and 9, respectively, compared with 58 and 57 of 72 control females. Broods produced by infected females were significantly smaller than those of control females. Infected individuals were less likely to mate successfully. The results are discussed in terms of their consequences for transmission, host fitness, and potential effects on host populations.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Biology
Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Authors:Kokkotis, T. and McLaughlin, J. Daniel
Journal or Publication:Canadian Journal of Zoology
Date:January 2006
Funders:
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
ID Code:6779
Deposited By:DANIELLE DENNIE
Deposited On:13 Jul 2010 12:09
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 18:07
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...

Concordia University - Footer