Breadcrumb

 
 

Aboriginal newspapers : their contribution to the emergence of an alternative public sphere in Canada

Title:

Aboriginal newspapers : their contribution to the emergence of an alternative public sphere in Canada

Avison, Shannon (1996) Aboriginal newspapers : their contribution to the emergence of an alternative public sphere in Canada. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
PDF
8Mb

Abstract

This thesis explores the contribution of the regional Indian, Metis and Inuit newspapers to the development of an alternative political public sphere for Aboriginal peoples in Canada. It argues that although the development of the newspapers was an important aspect of the political and cultural development, these newspapers were, to use Habermas' terminology, "feudalized" by the political organizations that created them, the Canadian state that funded them and the marketplace that determines their fate today. Using Jurgen Habermas' concept of the public sphere, this thesis considers the contribution that these publications made to the process of public opinion at the regional and national levels in Canada. It concludes that the regional newspapers did contribute to the national Aboriginal public sphere, but that state policies and financial exigencies limited their contribution and prevented them from realizing their full potential in the lives of Aboriginal Canadians.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Communication Studies
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Avison, Shannon
Pagination:viii, 225 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Communication Studies
Date:1996
Thesis Supervisor(s):Roth, Lorna
ID Code:768
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:14
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:16
Related URLs:
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...

Concordia University - Footer