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Investigating the relationship between knowledge management capability and knowledge transfer success

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Investigating the relationship between knowledge management capability and knowledge transfer success

Manovas, Mantas (2004) Investigating the relationship between knowledge management capability and knowledge transfer success. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

To gain a competitive advantage, a company must have the ability to effectively manage its chief asset, knowledge. Out of various types of knowledge that firms possess, its ability to satisfy customer requirements plays a crucial role in its ability to provide a quality product/service. More specifically, in information technology (IT) projects, customer requirements need to be effectively and efficiently transferred to the IT department. In return, the IT department must efficiently and effectively meet these needs. This thesis examined the relationship between knowledge management capabilities and knowledge transfer success in IT departments in Canadian companies. An online survey collected empirical data from 54 IT managers. This data was analyzed using the partial least square (PLS) structural equation modeling method. The findings show that for knowledge transfer to be successful in an IT project, the IT department must have both a solid knowledge infrastructure and a knowledge process capability. Within these capabilities, key infrastructure factors and knowledge processes were identified. Application and Acquisition proved to be significant in ensuring a solid process infrastructure, while Culture of Learning, Culture of Sharing, Collaboration Technology, Opportunity Generation Technology, Structure that supports Collaboration and System of Rewards were found to be important infrastructure elements. Furthermore, the findings reveal that knowledge processes are key to ensuring knowledge transfer efficiency, but not necessarily effectiveness; while knowledge infrastructure determines knowledge transfer effectiveness, but not necessarily efficiency.

Divisions:Concordia University > John Molson School of Business
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Manovas, Mantas
Pagination:viii, 113 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M. Sc. Admin.
Program:John Molson School of Business
Date:2004
Thesis Supervisor(s):Laframboise, Kevin
ID Code:8096
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:18 Aug 2011 14:15
Last Modified:18 Aug 2011 15:47
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