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Antecedents of computer self-efficacy and behavioral intention to use new IT : an investigation of the role of personality traits

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Antecedents of computer self-efficacy and behavioral intention to use new IT : an investigation of the role of personality traits

Saleem, Huma (2005) Antecedents of computer self-efficacy and behavioral intention to use new IT : an investigation of the role of personality traits. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Computer self-efficacy has been shown to play an important role in one's decision to use new information technology. While there has been a wealth of research on the antecedents of CSE, only a few have examined CSE's relationship with individual characteristics and it is only recently that the role of stable individual traits has gained prevalence. Meanwhile, in the 1990's, researchers converged upon the Five-Factor Model of personality as the premiere framework of personality and uncovered several relationships between these 5 factors of personality (neuroticism, extraversion, openness, conscientiousness, and agreeableness) and organizational behavior variables. Due to a needed focus on individual differences as they relate to IT use, in conjunction with the emergence of the five-factor model of personality as a credible tool in psychology, the present study aims at investigating the relationships between the five factors of personality and computer self-efficacy. A web-survey of 143 faculty members and graduate students who had not yet used the Self-Checkout library system available at a large Canadian university was conducted. Results suggest that extraversion is positively related to CSE, while neuroticism is negatively related to CSE. Results also indicate a positive relationship between CSE and perceived ease of use, and a positive relationship between PEOU and behavioral intention to use new IT. The study offers a humanistic viewpoint to the technology adoption literature, adds to research examining the relationship between stable and dynamic individual differences, and to organizational behavior literature that has shown a renewed interest in the role of personality in organizational contexts. Results are also useful in training and selection processes.

Divisions:Concordia University > John Molson School of Business
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Saleem, Huma
Pagination:xi, 123 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M. Sc. Admin.
Program:John Molson School of Business
Date:2005
Thesis Supervisor(s):Beaudry, Anne
ID Code:8299
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:18 Aug 2011 14:21
Last Modified:18 Aug 2011 14:21
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