Breadcrumb

 
 

Caped commodities and masked memories : the American comic book industry, collective memory, and the superhero

Title:

Caped commodities and masked memories : the American comic book industry, collective memory, and the superhero

Schulz, Michael (2005) Caped commodities and masked memories : the American comic book industry, collective memory, and the superhero. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
13Mb

Abstract

This thesis explores the relationship between collective memory, history and popular culture as it pertains to the American superhero comic. It examines some of the reasons behind and ways that American comic book publishers change their superhero character properties over time. This entails looking at the consequences of the ownership of character properties to the industry and the resulting economic impetus to alter their characters to both resonate with contemporary audiences and to keep them accessible to new readers. Despite these changes, those aspects of the superhero comic that are changed by this economic drive rarely disappear. Rather, comic book history continues to play a vital role in comic book fandom. Thus, this thesis examines the development and role of comic book reprints in the industry and comic book fandom. In a similar vein, it explores the role that knowledge of a character's--or a publisher's stable of characters'--diagetic history plays in contemporary superhero narratives and how such knowledge is disseminated. Both of these studies argue that knowledge and appreciation of past comic books play a vital role in contemporary comic book narratives and fandom. Finally, this thesis examines how discarded elements of past comic books come into play as allusions in later superhero narratives. This thesis questions if such allusions have been used as a means to represent the historical moments that the alluded to elements of past comic books are associated with. Ultimately this thesis argues that such allusive comics are one of the many textual resources that some theorists consider vital to understanding contemporary collective memory

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Communication Studies
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Schulz, Michael
Pagination:v, 153 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Communication Studies
Date:2005
Thesis Supervisor(s):Acland, Charles
ID Code:8357
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:18 Aug 2011 14:23
Last Modified:18 Aug 2011 14:23
Related URLs:
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...

Concordia University - Footer