Breadcrumb

 
 

Finite element splitting methods applied to incompressible navier-stokes flow solvers and introduction to mixed mass method

Title:

Finite element splitting methods applied to incompressible navier-stokes flow solvers and introduction to mixed mass method

Balage, Sudantha (2006) Finite element splitting methods applied to incompressible navier-stokes flow solvers and introduction to mixed mass method. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
4Mb

Abstract

Splitting Methods are considered to be a strong candidate for obtaining accurate, robust and computationally efficient incompressible Navier-Stokes (NS) solvers based on Finite Element Method. The type of spatial errors such as the numerical boundary layer observed on pressure solution near walls is known to affect the stability of NS solvers. The inclusion of stabilization terms such as upwinding or artificial viscosity terms would adversely affect the accuracy of the solver. NS solvers based on LBB compliant elements, such as Taylor Hood (TH) elements do not require stabilization terms to simulate higher Reynolds number flow provided their robustness is not affected by above mentioned type of error. This motivates the study of Splitting Methods based on Taylor Hood elements with the emphasis on how well they handle numerical boundary layer type errors to obtain highly accurate NS flow solvers. The effect of the enrichment of the TH elements with pressure bubble nodes is also investigated. The present work brings several well-known Splitting Methods under a common theoretical framework and classifies them appropriate to the study.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science > Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Balage, Sudantha
Pagination:xv, 106 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A. Sc.
Program:Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Date:2006
Thesis Supervisor(s):Paraschivoiu, Marius
ID Code:8906
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:18 Aug 2011 14:39
Last Modified:18 Aug 2011 14:39
Related URLs:
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...

Concordia University - Footer