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How do involvement and product knowledge affect the relationship between intangibility and perceived risk for brands and product categories?

Title:

How do involvement and product knowledge affect the relationship between intangibility and perceived risk for brands and product categories?

Laroche, Michel and Nepomuceno, Marcelo Vinhal and Richard, Marie-Odile (2010) How do involvement and product knowledge affect the relationship between intangibility and perceived risk for brands and product categories? Journal of Consumer Marketing, 27 (3). pp. 197-210. ISSN 0736-3761

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/07363761011038275

Abstract

Purpose – Intangibility has long been studied in marketing, especially its physical aspect. This paper seeks to verify whether a branding strategy is efficient in reducing the risk perceived by customers.

Design/methodology/approach – A sample of university students answered the measurements considering both perspectives (brands and product categories). The paper uses a three-dimensional approach of intangibility and explores its relationships with evaluation difficulty (ED) and perceived risk (PR). These relationships were tested in two different perspectives: brands and product categories.

Findings – Two analyses were made to test the hypotheses which were generally supported. Several relationships between the variables were found, but three should be highlighted. First, it was shown that brands are more mentally intangible than product categories, which may lead to a difficulty to evaluate. Second, it was found that evaluation difficulty increases the perceived risk in the product category perspective. Third, it was found that higher involvement generates a stronger relationship between evaluation difficulty and perceived risk for the product category perspective.

Practical implications – Theoretical and managerial implications to the literature are discussed along with examples of how managers could use the findings.

Originality/value – The research incorporates prior knowledge and involvement as moderating variables of the proposed framework and reinforces their relevance to the field. The results not only show the importance of branding, but also support the argument of considering evaluation difficulty in future research.

Divisions:Concordia University > John Molson School of Business > Marketing
Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Authors:Laroche, Michel and Nepomuceno, Marcelo Vinhal and Richard, Marie-Odile
Journal or Publication:Journal of Consumer Marketing
Date:2010
Funders:
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
ID Code:973658
Deposited By:ANDREA MURRAY
Deposited On:14 Mar 2012 16:22
Last Modified:14 Mar 2012 16:22
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