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The Role of Anger in Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Title:

The Role of Anger in Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Deschenes, Sonya S., Dugas, Michel J., Fracalanza, Katie and Koerner, Naomi (2012) The Role of Anger in Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 41 (3). pp. 261-271. ISSN 1650-6073

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16506073.2012.666564

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the role of anger in the context of anxiety disorders, particularly with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The goal of the current study was to examine the relations between specific dimensions of anger and GAD. Method: Participants (N = 381) completed a series of questionnaires, including the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-Q-IV; Newman et al., 2002), the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI-2; Spielberger, 1999), and the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ; Buss & Perry, 1992). The GAD-Q-IV identifies individuals who meet diagnostic criteria for GAD (i.e., GAD-analogues) and those who do not (non-GAD). The STAXI-2 includes subscales for trait anger, externalized anger expression, internalized anger expression, externalized anger control, and internalized anger control. The AQ includes subscales for physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, and hostility. Results: The GAD-Q-IV significantly correlated with all STAXI-2 and AQ subscales (r’s ranging from .10 to .46). Multivariate analyses of variance revealed that GAD-analogues significantly differed from non-GAD participants on the combined STAXI-2 subscales (η² = .098); high levels of trait anger and internalized anger expression contributed most to GAD group membership. GAD-analogue participants also significantly differed from non-GAD participants on the combined AQ subscales (η² = .156); high levels of anger (affective component of aggression) and hostility contributed most to GAD group membership. Within the GAD-analogue group, the STAXI-2 and AQ subscales significantly predicted GAD symptom severity (R2 = .124 and R2 = .198, respectively). Conclusions: Elevated levels of multiple dimensions of anger characterize individuals who meet diagnostic criteria for GAD.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Authors:Deschenes, Sonya S. and Dugas, Michel J. and Fracalanza, Katie and Koerner, Naomi
Journal or Publication:Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Date:2012
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):10.1080/16506073.2012.666564
ID Code:976902
Deposited By: ANDREA MURRAY
Deposited On:20 Feb 2013 19:34
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:43
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