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An In-depth Analysis of Autonomous Motivation: The Role of Social Media in Gaining Millennial's Support for Charitable Causes

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An In-depth Analysis of Autonomous Motivation: The Role of Social Media in Gaining Millennial's Support for Charitable Causes

Gutberg, Jennifer (2013) An In-depth Analysis of Autonomous Motivation: The Role of Social Media in Gaining Millennial's Support for Charitable Causes. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

The purpose of the present study is to expand upon the tenets of Self-Determination Theory within a context of social media (SM). Specifically, we are assessing the impact of dimensions of autonomous motivation on Millennials’ support for charitable causes, in the social media domain.
It has been said that ‘Millennials’ (those born after 1980) will be the most influential generation since the Baby Boomers. They are socially aware and civic-minded and engaged in helping societal causes. Furthermore, the relationship the Millennial shares with arguably the most influential form of modern technology, social media, is truly groundbreaking. Social media has proven itself to be a powerful tool, not only for businesses, but also for society as a whole.
The total sample consisted of 592 participants from two separate studies: Study 1 (CURE Foundation Denim Night Party in support of breast cancer awareness) and Study 2 (Dans la rue/Five Days for the Homeless charity to raise awareness for youth homelessness). Results indicated that integrated extrinsic motivation significantly predicted online-, cause-, and event-related behaviour intentions, while intrinsic motivation to know and experience stimulation significantly predicted all three behaviour intentions. Both the
managerial and theoretical implications of this study are addressed herein, as well as future research avenues.

Divisions:Concordia University > John Molson School of Business > Management
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Gutberg, Jennifer
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M. Sc.
Program:Administration (Management option)
Date:1 March 2013
Thesis Supervisor(s):Ferguson, Ronald and Paulin, Michèle
ID Code:976970
Deposited By: JENNIFER GUTBERG
Deposited On:12 Jun 2013 19:24
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:43

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