Login | Register

“In the Name of Common Sense, Had Not Gentlemen Got Enough?” The Moral and Constitutional Objections to Manifest Destiny, 1803-1848

Title:

“In the Name of Common Sense, Had Not Gentlemen Got Enough?” The Moral and Constitutional Objections to Manifest Destiny, 1803-1848

Olsson, Mark (2013) “In the Name of Common Sense, Had Not Gentlemen Got Enough?” The Moral and Constitutional Objections to Manifest Destiny, 1803-1848. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
Olsson_MA_S2013-1.pdf - Accepted Version
965kB

Abstract

In the first half of the nineteenth century, the United States extended its territory westward from the original border along the Mississippi River until it possessed all the territory north of the Rio Grande and south of 49° N, all the way to the Pacific Ocean. The majority of Americans approved of this expansion, which came to be termed Manifest Destiny. Concerning those American citizens who opposed Manifest Destiny, historians have constructed models that generally describe the dissent as motivated by economic self-interest, sectional friction, partisan politics, or by a lack of the technological capacity necessary to efficiently govern distant regions. These models are very useful, but do not paint a complete picture. In some cases, opposition to territorial expansion was based on a conviction that the actions being taken violated the Constitution of the United States. For some, their dissent was rooted in a sense of morality and the belief that the United States was acting in a manner dangerous to republican ideals, and a stain on the nation’s character and reputation. This thesis will examine this form of opposition as it pertains to the Louisiana Purchase, the seizing of West Florida, the War of 1812, the annexation of Oregon and Texas, and the Mexican- American War. It will present the voices of those who denied that Americans had a constitutional or moral right to grasp land held by others, not because it wasn’t in their best interests, but because they believed it was fundamentally unjust.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > History
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Olsson, Mark
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:History
Date:March 2013
Thesis Supervisor(s):Taylor, Gavin
ID Code:977216
Deposited By: MARK OLSSON
Deposited On:12 Jun 2013 15:32
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:44
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Back to top Back to top