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Left Ventricular Flow Patterns after Percutaneous Edge-to-Edge Mitral Valve Repair: An in vitro Study

Title:

Left Ventricular Flow Patterns after Percutaneous Edge-to-Edge Mitral Valve Repair: An in vitro Study

Jeyhani, Morteza (2013) Left Ventricular Flow Patterns after Percutaneous Edge-to-Edge Mitral Valve Repair: An in vitro Study. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Percutaneous mitral valve edge-to-edge repair is a viable solution in high-risk patients with severe symptomatic mitral regurgitation. However, the generated double-orifice configuration poses challenges for the evaluation of the hemodynamic performance of the mitral valve and may alter flow patterns in the left ventricle during diastole. The purpose of the present in vitro study is to provide new insight into the spatial-temporal hemodynamics of the flow distal to simulated percutaneous edge-to-edge repair by employing a high resolution, flow diagnostic method, Phase Locked and Time Resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry inside the LV.

A custom-made mitral valve was developed and two configurations were tested: a single orifice valve with mitral regurgitation and a double-orifice mitral valve configuration. The hemodynamic performance of the valve was evaluated using Doppler echocardiography and catheterization. The flow patterns in the left ventricle were investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry.

Edge-to-edge repair significantly reduced the regurgitant volume. There was a good agreement between Doppler and catheter transmitral pressure gradients. There was a good match between maximal velocity measured by Doppler and particle image velocimetry. Vortex development in the left ventricle during diastole was significantly different after repair.

There was a good agreement between Doppler and catheter measurements of transmitral pressure gradient following simulated edge-to-edge repair. Flow in the left ventricle was significantly altered by the repair and led to higher energy dissipation during diastole.

Divisions:Concordia University > Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science > Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Jeyhani, Morteza
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A. Sc.
Program:Mechanical Engineering
Date:November 2013
Thesis Supervisor(s):Kadem, Lyes
ID Code:978076
Deposited By: MORTEZA JEYHANI
Deposited On:19 Jun 2014 20:30
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:45
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