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Well-to-wheels energy efficiency analysis of plug-in electric vehicles including varying charging regimes

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Well-to-wheels energy efficiency analysis of plug-in electric vehicles including varying charging regimes

Saeidi Dehaghani, Ebrahim (2013) Well-to-wheels energy efficiency analysis of plug-in electric vehicles including varying charging regimes. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

ABSTRACT
Well-to-Wheels Energy Efficiency Analysis and Optimal Energy Management Strategy for Varying Electric Vehicle Operational Characteristics
Ebrahim Saeidi Dehaghani
Transition to electric vehicles (EVs) is already under way. EVs were demonstrated to be the most fuel economic and emission free among other propulsion technologies. Electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (EVs/PHEVs) can have a large impact on greenhouse gases (GHGs) reduction, increase in fuel economy and higher fuel efficiency. This thesis seeks to investigate the Well-to-Wheels (WTW) energy efficiency analysis of Electric Vehicles (EVs) in Canada. The main idea behind this research work is to analyze step by step energy efficiency, which is one of the key factors for EVs technology acceptance. Penetration of battery electric and more electric vehicles (BEVs/MEVs) into vehicle fleet, affects load demand as well as electricity market. Smart charging of EVs can remove a lot of stress from electricity grid. Effect of home charging of EVs/PHEVs on electricity demand in the province of Quebec was analyzed. More recently, EVs have been looked at as distributed sources of energy, whereby they could back up the power grid during critical high demand periods. With the help of an on-board battery pack, EVs can act as distributed generators and feedback energy to the AC grid. However, efficiency of energy conversion could become an issue in this power flow. Hence, in this thesis stage-by-stage efficiency of vehicle-to-grid (V2G) power flow was evaluated. In addition, feasibility of using EVs in international islanding to sustain the local grid in the event of an emergency was analyzed.

Divisions:Concordia University > Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science > Electrical and Computer Engineering
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Saeidi Dehaghani, Ebrahim
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A. Sc.
Program:Electrical and Computer Engineering
Date:December 2013
Thesis Supervisor(s):Williamson, Sheldon S.
ID Code:978081
Deposited By: EBRAHIM SAEIDI DEHAGHANI
Deposited On:16 Jun 2014 18:51
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:46
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