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Acute Physiological, Symptomatic and Affective Responses to Exercise Training and Relationship with Exercise Adherence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Title:

Acute Physiological, Symptomatic and Affective Responses to Exercise Training and Relationship with Exercise Adherence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Rizk, Amanda Katy (2014) Acute Physiological, Symptomatic and Affective Responses to Exercise Training and Relationship with Exercise Adherence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. PhD thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Study Objectives: i) To describe and compare, in COPD patients, the acute physiological, symptomatic, and affective responses to continuous training at a high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at the ventilatory threshold (CTVT), and interval training (IT); ii) To examine the nature and degree of association between acute measures of intensity and adherence to a 12-week exercise-training program; iii) To investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated or moderated by affect/vigor.

Methods: Thirty-five COPD patients (FEV1 = 60.2 ± 15.8 % predicted) underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT, or IT, were monitored during a single exercise-training bout, and subsequently took part in a 12-week exercise-training program. Physiological, symptomatic, and affective responses were measured using a portable system, the PANAS and GVA questionnaires, and the Borg scale; respectively. Adherence was defined as the percent time spent within the target heart rate range for attended sessions.

Results: In comparison to CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower levels of RER, HR, and RR, whereas IT was associated with higher levels of VE, VE/MVV, RR, and a greater drop in SpO2. Affective state generally improved from pre- to post-exercise, with increases in positive affect (F=9.74, p<0.001) and decreases in negative affect (F=6.43, p=0.005). The CTVT group experienced a greater dip in global affect mid-exercise compared to CTHI (p=0.04), yet had a higher level of end-exercise alertness compared to CTHI (p=0.01) and IT (p=0.02). The IT group reported the lowest levels of post-exercise alertness (p=0.04 versus CTHI and p=0.02 versus CTVT), and significantly lower 12-week adherence rates (F=6.69, p=0.004). Mean exercise VO2 (r=-0.466, p=0.007) and end-exercise global vigor (r=0.420, p=0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. The moderation model was supported, where end-exercise global vigor moderated the relationship between VO2 and adherence (β=2.74, t (32)=2.32, p=0.03).

Conclusion: Compared to CTHI, CTVT was associated with less physiological strain, and greater end-exercise alertness, while IT was associated with slightly more physiological strain, lower post-exercise alertness, and lower 12-week adherence rates. VO2 and end-exercise global vigor were most strongly associated with adherence. Acute end-exercise vigor was found to moderate the relationship between acute VO2 and adherence.

Divisions:Concordia University > School of Graduate Studies
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Authors:Rizk, Amanda Katy
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Ph. D.
Program:Special Individualized Program
Date:March 2014
Thesis Supervisor(s):Pepin, Véronique
ID Code:978395
Deposited By: AMANDA RIZK
Deposited On:16 Jun 2014 14:08
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:46
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