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Can in-situ experience compensate for hatchery-deprivation? Enhancing post-stocking survival of juvenile Atlantic salmon.

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Can in-situ experience compensate for hatchery-deprivation? Enhancing post-stocking survival of juvenile Atlantic salmon.

LeBlanc, Michelle (2015) Can in-situ experience compensate for hatchery-deprivation? Enhancing post-stocking survival of juvenile Atlantic salmon. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exhibit maladaptive behaviour when stocked into natural streams
following one generation in a hatchery setting, reducing post-stocking survival. These behavioural
patterns are commonly attributed to ‘hatchery selection’, where maladaptive phenotypes arise from the
inadvertent selection of behavioural traits, lack of experience caused by captivity, or a combination of
both. ‘Life skills training’, in which hatchery-reared fish are conditioned to exhibit appropriate
behaviour responses, may increase post-stocking survival.
A semi-natural field experiment, using in-situ mesh enclosures, compared wild-caught juvenile salmon to
hatchery-reared counterparts from the same population. Fish were observed for antipredator, foraging,
and territorial defense responses. Results showed no significant differences between wild and hatchery
raised fish, although behaviour was significantly different between years. Overall, week long trials were
insufficient in separating significant differences between strains, indicating one generation in captivity
may not create major behavioural separation between wild and hatchery fish from the same population,
or that more than one week is required for differences to become apparent. Behavioural response
training protocols are suggested for hatchery raised experientially deprived fish destined for stocking.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Biology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:LeBlanc, Michelle
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M. Sc.
Program:Biology
Date:30 November 2015
Thesis Supervisor(s):Brown, Grant
Keywords:salmon, Atlantic salmon, behavioural ecology, territory, foraging rate, chemical ecology, restocking, hatchery deprivation
ID Code:980757
Deposited By: MICHELLE LEBLANC
Deposited On:16 Jun 2016 14:53
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:51
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