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Control strategies for managing physical health problems in old age: Evidence for the motivational theory of life-span development

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Control strategies for managing physical health problems in old age: Evidence for the motivational theory of life-span development

Barlow, Meaghan A., Wrosch, Carsten, Heckhausen, Jutta and Schulz, Richard (2016) Control strategies for managing physical health problems in old age: Evidence for the motivational theory of life-span development. In: Perceived control: Theory, research, and practice in the first 50 years. Oxford University Press. (In Press)

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Abstract

This chapter addresses how older adults manage the occurrence of physical health threats. Based on the motivational theory of life-span development (Heckhausen, Wrosch, & Schulz, 2010), we show how an opportunity-adjusted use of control strategies prevents older adults from experiencing the adverse psychological and physical consequences of confronting age-related declines in their physical health. We begin this chapter by outlining some of the basic theoretical assumptions of the motivational theory of life-span development, proposing a model for managing physical health threats in older adulthood. Next, we review the empirical literature on the effects of using control strategies for addressing physical health declines in the elderly. We finally suggest promising avenues for future research.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Book Section
Refereed:Yes
Authors:Barlow, Meaghan A. and Wrosch, Carsten and Heckhausen, Jutta and Schulz, Richard
Date:2016
ID Code:980922
Deposited By: CARSTEN WROSCH
Deposited On:09 Mar 2016 17:04
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:52
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