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Predicting Extreme Returns in the Canadian Stock Market

Title:

Predicting Extreme Returns in the Canadian Stock Market

Zhao, Yun (2016) Predicting Extreme Returns in the Canadian Stock Market. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

This study examines the relationship between volatility and the probability of occurrence of expected extreme returns in the Canadian market. Three measures of volatility are examined: implied volatility from firm option prices, conditional volatility calculated using an EGARCH model and idiosyncratic volatility based on the Fama and French five-factor model. A significantly positive relationship is observed between a firm’s idiosyncratic volatility and the probability of occurrence of an extreme return in the subsequent month for firms. A 10% increase in idiosyncratic volatility in a given month is associated with the probability of an extreme shock in the subsequent month (top or bottom 1.5% of the returns distribution) of 26.4%. Other firm characteristics, including firm age, price, volume and Book-to-Market ratio, are also shown to be significantly related to subsequent firm extreme returns. The effects of conditional and implied volatility are mixed.

Keywords: Extreme return; Implied volatility; Conditional volatility; Idiosyncratic volatility; Five-Factor model; Probit regression;
JEL Codes: G10, G11, G14, G17

Divisions:Concordia University > John Molson School of Business > Finance
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Zhao, Yun
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M. Sc.
Program:Administration (Finance option)
Date:1 March 2016
Thesis Supervisor(s):Switzer, Lorne
ID Code:981171
Deposited By: YUN ZHAO
Deposited On:17 Jun 2016 14:36
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:52
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