Login | Register

The Line that Belts the World: Transnationality, the Colour Line, and Race During the Great War

Title:

The Line that Belts the World: Transnationality, the Colour Line, and Race During the Great War

Procee, Charles Paulus (2019) The Line that Belts the World: Transnationality, the Colour Line, and Race During the Great War. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
Procee_MA_S2019.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Spectrum Terms of Access.
3MB

Abstract

The First World War was a period of significant social upheaval, as political, economic, and social conditions were placed under extreme stresses. W. E. B. Du Bois viewed this period as not just a conflict between nations, rather it was a life and death struggle for the future of the “darker races of the world.” Accordingly, Du Bois believed that African American participation in the Great War would be instrumental in attaining not only their own rights, but the rights of all “darker races.” However, it was an accident of timing, necessitated by the need for wartime labour and fighting men—on both sides of the Atlantic—that brought thousands of black Africans and African Americans to France. Thus, the war would place hundreds of thousands of black men into a heavily racialized context. This thesis proposes to track the racial artifacts that African Americans experienced as the Great War took them from the “brutal” race regime of the United States, to its “benevolent” counterpart in France, and back again. As such, it seeks to understand how this conflict shaped the articulation of race within a transnational context. In addition, a secondary goal of this comparative exploration of “brutal” American and “benevolent” French racisms, is to qualify the reputation of France as a bastion of racial equality.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > History
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Procee, Charles Paulus
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:History
Date:31 March 2019
Thesis Supervisor(s):Ventura, Theresa
ID Code:985205
Deposited By: Charles Paulus Procee
Deposited On:17 Jun 2019 16:14
Last Modified:17 Jun 2019 16:14
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
- Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
Back to top Back to top