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Effect of overhang on wind-driven rain wetting of facades on a mid-rise building: Field measurements

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Effect of overhang on wind-driven rain wetting of facades on a mid-rise building: Field measurements

Ge, Hua, Chiu, Vincent and Stathopoulos, Ted (2017) Effect of overhang on wind-driven rain wetting of facades on a mid-rise building: Field measurements. Building and Environment, 118 . pp. 234-250.

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Official URL: https://doi-org.lib-ezproxy.concordia.ca/10.1016/j...

Abstract

Wind-driven rain (WDR) is one of the main sources of moisture damages in buildings. Roof overhangs are a common feature that can be used to reduce WDR on building facades. However, there is very limited information on the quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of overhangs in reducing WDR on building façades, especially through field measurements. A six-story building with a low-sloped roof located in Vancouver has been equipped with a retractable overhang along with a rooftop weather station measuring wind speed, wind direction and horizontal rainfall and a total of 31 WDR gauges measuring WDR on building facades. The spatial distribution of WDR on the building façade has been studied without and with overhangs. The effectiveness of roof overhang is studied with respect to wind speed, wind direction and rainfall intensity. Field measurements show that for the particular climate characterized by long rainy winters with mild wind and rain, the overhang is effective and significantly reduces WDR for this six-story building, especially for areas directly underneath the overhang. The protection increases from the side edge to the center and from the bottom to the top of the façade. As expected, the larger overhang provides greater protection. The relationship between overhang effectiveness and distance from the roofline is quasi-linear with smaller gradient for the larger overhang. The effectiveness of the overhang is highly dependent on wind speed and wind direction - it increases for oblique winds but decreases with the increase of wind speed.

Divisions:Concordia University > Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science > Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Authors:Ge, Hua and Chiu, Vincent and Stathopoulos, Ted
Journal or Publication:Building and Environment
Date:2017
Funders:
  • NSERC Strategic Research Network for Engineered Wood-based Building Systems (NEWBuildS)
  • BC Housing
  • Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science of Concordia University
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):10.1016/j.buildenv.2017.03.034
ID Code:986029
Deposited By: THEODORE STATHOPOULOS
Deposited On:30 Oct 2019 12:38
Last Modified:30 Oct 2019 12:38
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