Login | Register

Phase-Amplitude Coupling of Theta and Gamma Rhythms During Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Impacting Memory Across the Lifespan

Title:

Phase-Amplitude Coupling of Theta and Gamma Rhythms During Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Impacting Memory Across the Lifespan

Gillman, Samuel O'Brien (2022) Phase-Amplitude Coupling of Theta and Gamma Rhythms During Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Impacting Memory Across the Lifespan. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[thumbnail of Gillman_MSc_F2022.pdf]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
Gillman_MSc_F2022.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Spectrum Terms of Access.
4MB

Abstract

Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) between brain oscillations is thought to be an underlying neural mechanism of memory consolidation. Oscillation coupling may become weaker with greater age, possibly explaining natural memory decline across the lifespan, as suggested by studies of PAC during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Theta-gamma PAC (TGC) during wake is correlated with stronger encoding and better recall. However, it is unclear how TGC during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep correlates with memory or changes with age. I aimed to find TGC during REM sleep (REM TGC) affecting sleep-dependent memory consolidation that changes with age-related memory decline. We recorded scalp electroencephalography of good sleeping younger and older adults. Oscillatory data was extracted from filtered electroencephalography signals. Before sleep, participants learned a declarative memory or non-memory control task, then retested the respective task after sleep to measure memory consolidation. Memory consolidation was better in younger, compared to older, adults. REM TGC strength, measured by a modulation index, was not different between age groups nor task nights. Faster gamma coupling in a frontal channel was positively correlated with and predicts improvements in memory consolidation in younger adults. Slower gamma coupling in a central channel was positively correlated with memory consolidation in older adults. Our results suggest REM TGC strength is stable across the lifespan. However, the strength of faster TGC in younger and of slower TGC in older adults may improve memory consolidation. These results uncover more about how REM sleep and REM TGC changes across the lifespan, in relation to memory.


Keywords: rapid eye movement sleep, theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling, sleep-dependent memory consolidation, aging

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Health, Kinesiology and Applied Physiology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Gillman, Samuel O'Brien
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M. Sc.
Program:Health and Exercise Science
Date:29 September 2022
Thesis Supervisor(s):Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh
Keywords:rapid eye movement sleep, theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling, sleep-dependent memory consolidation, aging
ID Code:991210
Deposited By: Samuel Gillman
Deposited On:27 Oct 2022 14:29
Last Modified:27 Oct 2022 14:29
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
- Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
Back to top Back to top