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Comparing the online interpretation processes of metaphors and similes

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Comparing the online interpretation processes of metaphors and similes

Roncero, Carlos (2007) Comparing the online interpretation processes of metaphors and similes. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Metaphors take the form 'topic x is vehicle y' (e.g. life is a journey ). Similes add "like" (e.g. life is like a journey ). A reading experiment (self-paced moving-window paradigm) tested online interpretation of metaphors and similes followed by explanations; for example, John says life is (is like) a journey because it has many directions. Vehicles were read faster in metaphors than in similes. Explanations ( it has many directions ) were slower in similes than in metaphors. Frequency, but not aptness, was a predictor of reaction time; while aptness, but not frequency, was a predictor of agreement judgements. Aptness was also a more important predictor than frequency in affecting whether participants prefer a statement as a metaphor or a simile. Results are discussed in reference to Direct Statements theory (Chiappe & Kennedy, 2001), which argues that metaphors are processed like categorical statements, while similes are processed like comparison statements.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Roncero, Carlos
Pagination:vi, 52 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Psychology
Date:2007
Thesis Supervisor(s):Kennedy, John M
ID Code:975524
Deposited By: Concordia University Library
Deposited On:22 Jan 2013 16:09
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:40
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