Login | Register

“Between Rage and Love”: Disidentifications Among Racialized, Ethnicized, and Colonized Allosexual Activists in Montreal

Title:

“Between Rage and Love”: Disidentifications Among Racialized, Ethnicized, and Colonized Allosexual Activists in Montreal

Wong, Alan (2013) “Between Rage and Love”: Disidentifications Among Racialized, Ethnicized, and Colonized Allosexual Activists in Montreal. PhD thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
Wong_PhD_F2013.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Spectrum Terms of Access.
7MB

Abstract

This dissertation is an interdisciplinary analysis of activists in contemporary Montreal whose bodies are marked by the intersections of sexuality, race, ethnicity, colonization, gender, and class. I apply José Esteban Muñoz’s theory of disidentification, as read through Giorgio Agamben’s conceptualization of “whatever being,” to life story interviews collected from eight activists as well as to my own life narrative in order to interrogate and explore our construction of singular spaces—disidentificatory spaces—for ourselves. Within these spaces, we discover meaningful ways to belong without subjecting ourselves to the discursive demands of identification or non-identification. By focusing my study on three institutional aspects of our lives—family, citizenship, and activism—I show how our histories provide us with citations that disrupt the dominant narratives that aim to structure our lives in increasingly invasive, oppressive, and violent ways. In this respect, Montreal is an intriguing site for such disruptions to take place: a multicultural city in the North/West built on colonized land wherein sexual rights and freedoms commingle with language and nationalist politics to become a constant source of tension among its denizens. Thus, I argue that an expression of affect and emotion produced within a disidentifactory space is vital for minoritized subjects to negotiate this messiness, for disidentification itself is a messy process. I conclude by demonstrating that engaging with this messy process is necessary to the production of new forms of sociality, laying the path to a hopeful future that Muñoz calls “queer utopia.

Divisions:Concordia University > School of Graduate Studies
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Authors:Wong, Alan
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Ph. D.
Program:Special Individualized Program
Date:29 July 2013
Thesis Supervisor(s):Jiwani, Yasmin
Keywords:race, sexuality, queer, disidentification, identity, activism, citizenship, oral history, life story, family, ethnicity, First Nations, indigenous, nationalism, colonialism, racism, Montreal, emotion
ID Code:977483
Deposited By: ALAN WONG
Deposited On:13 Jan 2014 14:46
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:44
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Back to top Back to top