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Is it stress? The role of stress related systems in chronic food restriction-induced augmentation of heroin seeking in the rat

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Is it stress? The role of stress related systems in chronic food restriction-induced augmentation of heroin seeking in the rat

Sedki, Firas, Abbas, Zarish, Angelis, Staci, Martin, Jeffrey, D'Cunha, Tracey and Shalev, Uri (2013) Is it stress? The role of stress related systems in chronic food restriction-induced augmentation of heroin seeking in the rat. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7 (98). pp. 1-10. ISSN 1662-453X

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2013.00098

Abstract

Drug addiction is a chronic disease characterized by recurring episodes of abstinence and relapse. The precise mechanisms underlying this pattern are yet to be elucidated, but stress is thought to be a major factor in relapse. Recently, we reported that rats under withdrawal and exposed to a mild chronic stressor, prolonged food restriction, show increased heroin seeking compared to sated controls. Previous studies demonstrated a critical role for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticosterone, hormones involved in the stress response, in acute food deprivation-induced reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking. However, the role of CRF and corticosterone in chronic food restriction-induced augmentation of drug seeking remains unknown. Here, male Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer heroin for 10 days in operant conditioning chambers. Rats were then removed from the training chambers, and subjected to 14 days of unrestricted (sated rats) or a mildly restricted (FDR rats) access to food, which maintained their body weight (BW) at 90% of their baseline weight. On day 14, different groups of rats were administered a selective CRF1 receptor antagonist (R121919; 0.0, 20.0 mg/kg; s.c.), a non-selective CRF receptor antagonist (α-helical CRF; 0.0, 10.0, 25.0 μg/rat; i.c.v.) or a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist (RU486; 0.0, 30.0 mg/kg; i.p.), and underwent a 1 h drug seeking test under extinction conditions. An additional group of rats was tested following adrenalectomy. All FDR rats showed a statistically significant increase in heroin seeking compared to the sated rats. No statistically significant effects for treatment with α-helical CRF, R121919, RU486 or adrenalectomy were observed. These findings suggest that stress may not be a critical factor in the augmentation of heroin seeking in food-restricted rats.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Authors:Sedki, Firas and Abbas, Zarish and Angelis, Staci and Martin, Jeffrey and D'Cunha, Tracey and Shalev, Uri
Journal or Publication:Frontiers in Neuroscience
Date:6 June 2013
Funders:
  • Concordia Open Access Author Fund
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):10.3389/fnins.2013.00098
Keywords:self-administration, chronic food restriction, corticotropin-releasing factor, corticosterone, adrenalectomy, R121919, α-helical CRF, RU486
ID Code:977519
Deposited By: DAVID MACAULAY
Deposited On:15 Aug 2013 20:53
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:44
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