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Metal Organic Frameworks as Dual Functional Adsorbent/Catalysts for Plasma Air Purification Systems

Title:

Metal Organic Frameworks as Dual Functional Adsorbent/Catalysts for Plasma Air Purification Systems

Bahri, Mitra (2016) Metal Organic Frameworks as Dual Functional Adsorbent/Catalysts for Plasma Air Purification Systems. PhD thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Indoor air pollution is responsible for the annual premature death of millions of people worldwide. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are among these pollutants with proven detrimental effects on occupants’ health. Plasma-based methods’ capabilities for VOCs degradation have motivated designers to employ these methods for purifying indoor air environment. It has been demonstrated that utilizing a dual functional adsorbent/catalyst (DFA/C) in a plasma system can significantly enhance the VOCs removal and the system’s energy efficiency. However, selecting an appropriate DFA/C has remained a challenge.
For the first time, this research attempted to utilize metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as DFA/Cs for a plasma-driven catalytic reactor. Accordingly, three different MOFs, MIL-101 (MIL: Material Institute Lavoisier), MIL-53, and CPM-5 (CPM: Crystalline Porous Material-5) were synthesized through microwave and solvothermal methods. Furthermore, for the first time, a mechanochemical method was developed to synthesize CPM-5. To test the performance of the developed MOFs, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system was designed, set-up and calibrated. Several adsorption and oxidation experiments were performed to study the physical and chemical behaviors of these MOFs for the removal of toluene and isobutanol. Also, the effect of the presence of humidity on the adsorption/oxidation capacities of MOFs was investigated.
Further analyses were carried out to study the surface characteristic of the developed MOFs using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), BET surface area analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results for microwave-synthesized MIL-53 and CPM-5 and also solvothermal-synthesized MIL-101 showed a good crystallinity, very high specific surface area (SLangmuir: 1275-3747 m2/g), and acceptable thermal stability. In the case of mechanochemical-synthesized CPM-5, the TGA analysis showed a similar thermal stability compared to the microwave-synthesized CPM-5. However, the SEM micrographs showed a formation of different morphology of crystallites. Also, the surface area of the mechanochemical-synthesized CPM-5 was lower than the one synthesized by the microwave method.
The adsorption isotherms of toluene and isobutanol demonstrated the physisorption of these MOFs. This result was also confirmed by TGA characterization of samples before and after toluene adsorption. In addition, oxidation evaluation studies exhibited VOCs removal potential over these MOFs. MIL-101 and MIL-53 exhibited superior adsorption and oxidation ability than CPM-5 in most cases. Results also showed higher adsorption capacity of MIL-101 than MIL-53 in dry conditions but almost the same oxidation efficiency. Nevertheless, adsorption/oxidation capacities of MIL-53 surpassed MIL-101 in the presence of 30% relative humidity. Moreover, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed the stable structure of the examined MOFs after plasma-catalytic reactions, which indicated they were easy to be regenerated.
During the course of plasma-catalytic oxidation of toluene and isobutanol, different organic by-products and ozone were detected. Results showed utilization of a MOF as catalyst in the plasma system can reduce the downstream ozone concentration. Moreover, the presence of humidity suppressed the amount of ozone generation.
In conclusion, results demonstrated the potential capacity of MIL-53 and MIL-101 as DFA/Cs in plasma-catalyst air purification system.

Divisions:Concordia University > Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science > Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Authors:Bahri, Mitra
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Ph. D.
Program:Civil Engineering
Date:December 2016
Thesis Supervisor(s):Fariborz, Haghighat and Sohrab, Rohani
Keywords:Indoor air quality, Plasma, Air pollution, Metal organic framework, Dual functional adsorbent/catalyst, Volatile organic compound (VOC), PLasma-catalyst reactor
ID Code:982098
Deposited By: MITRA BAHRI
Deposited On:31 May 2017 17:58
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:54
Additional Information:This is a paper based Thesis.

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