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Parents’ Reading-related Knowledge, Literacy Feedback, and Children’s Reading and Writing Performances Across Three Contexts

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Parents’ Reading-related Knowledge, Literacy Feedback, and Children’s Reading and Writing Performances Across Three Contexts

Segal, Aviva (2018) Parents’ Reading-related Knowledge, Literacy Feedback, and Children’s Reading and Writing Performances Across Three Contexts. PhD thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

The role played by children’s social relationships in their development is unequivocal (e.g., Bandura, 1993; Bronfenbrenner & Morris, 2006; Vygotsky, 1978). Often, parents take on the role of children’s first literacy teachers (Hiebert & Adams, 1987) and literacy competence is critical for academic success and beyond. Research supports the significant association between parents’ underlying knowledge of English language (reading-related knowledge [RRK]; e.g., Ladd, Martin-Chang, Levesque, 2011) and children’s reading. However, the means through which this knowledge is conveyed (i.e., parental practices), has yet to be examined. Moreover, whether the same association holds between parental RRK and children’s writing is unknown. Thus, the primary goal of the present research was to fill these important gaps in the literature. To this end, the three manuscripts that comprise the dissertation focus on the relations between (1) parental RRK, parental feedback, and children’s reading; (2) parental RRK and parental feedback on a writing sample; and (3) parental RRK, parental feedback, and children’s writing. The sample consisted of 75 parents. All parents completed Study 2 tasks and their feedback was coded based on pre-established criteria. Seventy of their children participated in the parent-child studies. Therefore, Studies 1 and 3 consisted of 70 parent-child dyads. Dyadic exchanges were videotaped; all verbal and nonverbal exchanges were transcribed and coded for the presence of pre-established criteria specific to each study. Parental RRK was measured by parents’ performances on a series of activities and children’s literacy skills were assessed using reading and spelling subtests of the Wide Range Achievement Test-Fourth Edition (Wilkinson & Robertson, 2006). Results are presented within the framework of the extant teacher and parent RRK literature, with a focus on the novel findings of each investigation. Overall, this corpus of research allows for an understanding of the relations between parental RRK and practice across three different contexts; the data indicate similarities in evaluative feedback and differences in miscue feedback across the three studies. Specifically, in Study 1, RRK was positively associated with praise and letter-sound (graphophonemic) feedback parents provided when listening to their children read. In Study 2, parental RRK was positively associated with the amounts of praise and modeling they provided on a writing sample. In Study 3, parental RRK was positively associated with the amount of praise parents provided their children in the course of writing a thank you note together; RRK was additionally negatively associated with dictation. The implications of these findings are discussed more elaborately in each study section in terms of future research employing different methodologies to gain further insight into parental RRK and literacy practices that can enhance children’s learning.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Education
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Authors:Segal, Aviva
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Ph. D.
Program:Education
Date:February 2018
Thesis Supervisor(s):Martin-Chang, Sandra
ID Code:983619
Deposited By: AVIVA A. SEGAL
Deposited On:05 Jun 2018 14:34
Last Modified:05 Jun 2018 14:34
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