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A trajectory illusion and its relations to induced motion and smooth pursuit eye movements

Title:

A trajectory illusion and its relations to induced motion and smooth pursuit eye movements

Wada, Nancy Shima (2001) A trajectory illusion and its relations to induced motion and smooth pursuit eye movements. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Navigation in the environment relies, in part, on the visual system to differentiate self-motion from that of other objects. Research examining the way in which the brain is able to visually disentangle forward locomotion from eye motion, for example, suggests that the brain may have an eye movement compensation mechanism. Other findings, however, question the existence of this mechanism in that the previously reported illusory shift in the focus of expansion (FOE) may be due to induced motion. Yet, this alternative hypothesis may need to be revised in order to account for the perception of straight, radial trajectories as curved. In order to understand the conditions under which this trajectory illusion exists, the current investigation examined the role of induced motion, radial speed gradient, and smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM). Results suggest that the strength of the illusion relies on induced motion and SPEMs, thereby implicating that the role of eye movements in the illusory FOE shift needs to be taken into consideration.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Wada, Nancy Shima
Pagination:ix, 109 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Psychology
Date:2001
Thesis Supervisor(s):Von Grunau, Michael
ID Code:1437
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:19
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:20
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