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Female healers and the boundaries of medical practice in post-plague England

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Female healers and the boundaries of medical practice in post-plague England

Chamberland, Celeste (1997) Female healers and the boundaries of medical practice in post-plague England. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

This study is an exploration of the unlicensed and semi-official medical activities of women in England from 1348 to 1500. The emphasis is placed on the diversity of women's medical practice in both urban and rural areas. Some of the issues to be addressed are: the importance of herbalists and wet nurses as unacknowledged health care practitioners, the social and medical significance of hospital sisters, the variety of services offered by midwives and female surgeons, and the images of women healers in literature and science. The conclusions of this study are based on a critical analysis of traditional notions of professionalization and constructs of health and sickness.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > History
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Chamberland, Celeste
Pagination:v, 93 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Dept. of History
Date:1997
Thesis Supervisor(s):McSheffrey, Shannon
ID Code:181
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:10
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:13
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