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Identity formation and native Canadian women's literature : radicalizing resistance

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Identity formation and native Canadian women's literature : radicalizing resistance

Forsyth, Jessie (2002) Identity formation and native Canadian women's literature : radicalizing resistance. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Focusing on the literature of two writers, Lee Maracle and Jeannette Armstrong, this thesis explores processes of 'claiming voice' within a context of resistance. The central questions focus on challenges to, and methods of, re-writing affirming identities. Key theoretical concerns involve negotiating essentialist and constructivist discourses, and disrupting binary oppositions, in order to locate and legitimate claims of oppression without perpetuating the discursive structures supporting colonialist ideology. Using a wide range of texts, the thesis examines three aspects of identity formation as crucial to the project of radicalizing resistance: a dialogical interaction between personal and political identities; the need to re-write narratives of history; and the ways in which race- and gender-constructs intersect in naming 'Self.' Concepts of collaboration, continuity, and dialogue, expressed both thematically and structurally, play a key role throughout the thesis.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > English
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Forsyth, Jessie
Pagination:197 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:English
Date:2002
Thesis Supervisor(s):Freiwald, Bina
ID Code:1898
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:23
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:23
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