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The emergence of the Mohawk warrior flag : a symbol of indigenous unification and impetus to assertion of identity and rights commencing in the Kanienkehaka community of Kahnawake

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The emergence of the Mohawk warrior flag : a symbol of indigenous unification and impetus to assertion of identity and rights commencing in the Kanienkehaka community of Kahnawake

Horn-Miller, Kahente (2003) The emergence of the Mohawk warrior flag : a symbol of indigenous unification and impetus to assertion of identity and rights commencing in the Kanienkehaka community of Kahnawake. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

For centuries the Kanienkehaka (Mohawk) have struggled to maintain a certain level of autonomy by acting in accord with the principles of our constitution, the Kaienerekowa or Great Law of Peace. In the past, our interpretations of our law and of the core values of our society were greatly eroded and almost lost because of colonial influences. As Indigenous peoples we have found it necessary both to react to and to differentiate ourselves from the beliefs, values and practices that have been imposed on us. In recent decades, members of our communities have begun to take action, speaking up and creating artistic works about Indigenous culture and values. Our attempts to break free from foreign systems of governance, learning and religion sometimes use the tools of the dominant society. The work of Louis Karomaktajeh Hall is one example of this phenomenon. The Mohawk Warrior Flag he designed has been flown all over the world, serving as a symbol of the unity of Indigenous peoples in our common struggle, becoming a beacon of hope, and illuminating the discordant relationship between the dominant society and Indigenous peoples. My research, which deals in part with the appearance of the Flag during the Oka Crisis and Lobster Dispute at Esgenoopetitj (Burnt Church), is part of this movement. It introduces a Kanienkehaka perspective on the Flag, reconstructing its history and applying the philosophy of the Kaienerekowa to give a voice to the people who turn to it for support in their ongoing struggles with colonialism.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Sociology and Anthropology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Horn-Miller, Kahente
Pagination:viii, 230 leaves : ill., maps, ports. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Sociology and Anthropology
Date:2003
Thesis Supervisor(s):Howes, David
ID Code:2296
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:27
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:25
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