Breadcrumb

 
 

The Evolution of Chemical Alarm Signals: Attracting Predators Benefits Alarm Signal Senders

Title:

The Evolution of Chemical Alarm Signals: Attracting Predators Benefits Alarm Signal Senders

Chivers, D.P. and Brown, Grant E. and Smith, R. Jan F. (1996) The Evolution of Chemical Alarm Signals: Attracting Predators Benefits Alarm Signal Senders. The American Naturalist, 148 (4). pp. 649-659. ISSN 0003-0147

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
1042Kb

Official URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2556321

Abstract

Abstract.-A wide variety of organisms possess damage-released alarm pheromones that evoke antipredator responses in conspecifics. Understanding the evolution of such involuntary alarm signals has been perplexing because it is difficult to see direct benefits to the sender, notwith- standing benefits derived from warning relatives. Recently, it has been proposed that the alarm pheromone, or Schreckstoff, of Ostariophysan fishes may function in a fashion analogous to distress calls of many birds and mammals. The alarm pheromone may attract secondary preda- tors to the proximity of the primary predation event, and, once there, the secondary predators may disrupt the predation event, thus allowing the prey greater opportunity to escape. Previous findings have established that the alarm pheromone of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) attracts predators, including northern pike (Esox lucius) to an area. In this study we demonstrate that the probability that fathead minnows will escape after being captured by a northern pike is significantly increased through interference by a second pike. Taken with the previous findings that alarm pheromone attracts predators, these results are the first to provide empirical evidence of benefits to senders of an involuntary alarm signal

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Biology
Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Authors:Chivers, D.P. and Brown, Grant E. and Smith, R. Jan F.
Journal or Publication:The American Naturalist
Date:October 1996
Funders:
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
  • University of Saskatchewan
ID Code:6740
Deposited By:DANIELLE DENNIE
Deposited On:21 Jun 2010 16:56
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 18:13
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...

Concordia University - Footer