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Wind-induced pressures on canopies attached to the walls of low-rise buildings

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Wind-induced pressures on canopies attached to the walls of low-rise buildings

Candelario Suarez, Jose Daniel (2012) Wind-induced pressures on canopies attached to the walls of low-rise buildings. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Current knowledge regarding wind-induced pressures on attached canopies is restricted to a limited number of studies. As a result, most wind standards and codes of practice do not provide guidelines for the design of such components.
This thesis consists of a parametric study that expands current knowledge by providing a better understanding on the behavior of pressure coefficients acting on canopies attached to low rise buildings. All experimental results presented on this study have been carried out in the Building Aerodynamics Laboratory of Concordia University.
Two canopy models have been fabricated for the purpose of this study in the form of rectangular thin plates with pressure taps equally distributed along both upper and lower faces. These canopy models were attached at different locations on an acrylic glass building model with a gable roof of 4:12 slope. A total of 63 geometrically unique configurations were selected for this parametric study. The experiments were performed in the boundary layer wind tunnel for a simulated open terrain exposure. The 63 configurations, as well as the location of pressure taps on both faces of the canopy allow a detailed investigation of the different wind loading patterns exhibited as a function of the changes in the building geometry. A total number of 28 different wind directions have been tested for every configuration. Local and area-averaged peak values of the induced pressures have been analyzed as a function of the different geometrical relationships, which are unique to each configuration.
The experimental results indicate that a slight difference in the geometry of the attached canopy and the parent building can result in an 80% difference of the peak net pressure coefficient. It has also been noted that the most critical uplift forces occur in canopies located above the intermediate regions of the parent wall. In contrast, downward forces exhibit less sensitivity to changes in geometry.
Following the analysis and observations of the experimental data, recommended design guidelines have been provided for implementation in wind standards and building codes of practice. Comparisons with previous experimental results and provisions of other international standards and codes of practice are provided.

Divisions:Concordia University > Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science > Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Candelario Suarez, Jose Daniel
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A. Sc.
Program:Building Engineering
Date:26 November 2012
Thesis Supervisor(s):Stathopoulos, Ted
ID Code:974980
Deposited By: JOSE CANDELARIO SUAREZ
Deposited On:11 Sep 2013 15:36
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:39
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