Login | Register

Where have all the Nazirites gone? : the pacification of Judeo-Christian holiness as illuminated by Naziritic motifs in the Bible

Title:

Where have all the Nazirites gone? : the pacification of Judeo-Christian holiness as illuminated by Naziritic motifs in the Bible

Chakravarty, K. Gandhar (2007) Where have all the Nazirites gone? : the pacification of Judeo-Christian holiness as illuminated by Naziritic motifs in the Bible. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
MR34618.pdf - Accepted Version
4MB

Abstract

This thesis compares biblical naziritic behaviour. Through the various, often diametrically opposed characterizations of nazîrs, we can trace the reasons for which conceptions of holiness gradually became pacifistic in the context of Judeo-Christianity (ca. 1250 BCE-150 CE). Two distinct models of biblical naziritism can be posited: the tribal and the cultic nazîr. The tribal nazîr is a lifelong warrior of Yahweh who is consecrated in the womb and must never cut his or her hair or drink wine. The cultic nazîr, however, engages in a temporary vow in which a priest consecrates him or her and, furthermore, the cultic nazîr must also swear off contact from dead bodies during the period of consecration. These classifications, however, serve as no more than signposts to mark the limits of possibility. Often opposing traits and inconsistencies coexist within the characterization of a given naziritic figure. We can make sense of these contradictory representations as follows: when Israel was no more than a warring tribe (ca. 1250-1000 BCE) in Caanan eking out an existence in the promised land, religious heroes had to be warriors of some kind, but as the circumstances of Israel and Judah evolved over centuries, so that the Israelites and Judahites were increasingly subject to the rule of foreign powers, the Jewish priestly ruling class had to make amendments to presuppositions of holiness in order to discourage violent behaviour. The movement away from holy warrior continues to shift further until the incarnation of the holy person in early Christianity is far from militaristic.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Theological Studies
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Chakravarty, K. Gandhar
Pagination:viii, 95 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Theological Studies
Date:2007
Thesis Supervisor(s):Dion, M. F
ID Code:975342
Deposited By: Concordia University Library
Deposited On:22 Jan 2013 16:06
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:40
Related URLs:
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
- Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
Back to top Back to top