Login | Register

"Buying into sexy": preteen girls and consumer capitalism in the twenty-first century

Title:

"Buying into sexy": preteen girls and consumer capitalism in the twenty-first century

Goldfarb, Lilia (2008) "Buying into sexy": preteen girls and consumer capitalism in the twenty-first century. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
MR40990.pdf - Accepted Version
2MB

Abstract

We live in a hypersexualized society that infantilizes women and commodifies girls at the service of the capitalist system. In recent years, Quebec and other Western societies, have witnessed a rising concern about preadolescent girls showing signs of precocious sexualization. This issue, dismissed by some as a media moral panic and proof of girls' increased social power and agency, is taken very seriously by many others who worry about the impact it seems to be having on girls' well-being: unwanted pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), eating disorders, depression, self-harm, increased vulnerability to violence as well as a number of other negative health outcomes (APA, 2007). As the media continues to represent women as sexual objects they foster early sexualization, since they not only sell products and audiences but also an ideology that normalizes sexualized attitudes and behaviours (Agger, 2006). On the one hand, the 21st century North American corporate culture "seduces" girls with offerings of glitter, popularity and fame through sexualized popular cultural icons, via the media, operating at the service of and controlled by powerful economic interests; on the other hand, girls are blamed for letting themselves be lured into dressing and/or acting in oversexualized ways. Girls are caught in the crossfire between competing scripts : "Be sexy! Popular girls are" and "Good girls don't". I have named girls' attempts to conciliate and harmonize these competing scripts into a coherent whole: Cultural Script Theory.

Divisions:Concordia University > School of Graduate Studies
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Goldfarb, Lilia
Pagination:x, 149, [11] leaves : col. ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:School of Graduate Studies
Date:2008
Thesis Supervisor(s):Weber, Sandra
ID Code:975712
Deposited By: Concordia University Library
Deposited On:22 Jan 2013 16:13
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:41
Related URLs:
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
- Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
Back to top Back to top