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God is human : understanding human uniqueness in an evolving world

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God is human : understanding human uniqueness in an evolving world

Newland, Matthew Allen (2008) God is human : understanding human uniqueness in an evolving world. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

This work defends the understanding that Homo sapiens is a unique species, bearing an ontological distinction that makes it different from other species of animal life. However, challenges from contemporary biology and evolutionary theory may offer us reasons to either abandon the idea of human uniqueness entirely, or else revise our understanding of what human beings are in light of the presence of intelligent behavior in other animal species. Over the course of five chapters, I attempt to understand human nature through a multidisciplinary investigation. I do this by considering theological understandings and ethical theories in addition to scientific facts, recognizing that the scope of each is up to a point limited to its own universe of discourse. Overlaps between each discipline, however, allow for a broader and more comprehensive understanding of human nature than employing only one discipline will allow. My goal is to provide an understanding of human nature that is limited by neither scientific materialist nor religious fundamentalist perspectives.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Philosophy
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Newland, Matthew Allen
Pagination:vii, 129 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Philosophy
Date:2008
Thesis Supervisor(s):Allen, Paul
ID Code:975787
Deposited By: Concordia University Library
Deposited On:22 Jan 2013 16:14
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:41
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