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Hearing what we see: Eye tracking as an augmented performance instrument.

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Hearing what we see: Eye tracking as an augmented performance instrument.

Bacchus, Zorina (2013) Hearing what we see: Eye tracking as an augmented performance instrument. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

Eye tracking technology has been developed in science to track the movement of the eye while viewing images or reading. This technology requires an extensive background in science to both design an experiment, and to interpret the data. The aim of the current thesis is to investigate simple and approachable methods for the application of this technology in an artwork about the nature of looking. I created a performance art project to test the application of eye tracking towards constructing an instrument that expresses visual sounds in a performance. To accomplish this, I modified a method for low cost eye tracking to make a set of sound performing eyeglasses. This project showed that it is possible to use eye tracking outside of science in a artistic performance in novel ways, but also demonstrates that this technology could be further developed towards not
only solo artistic performances, but also towards other installation artworks that involve the spectator.

Divisions:Concordia University > School of Graduate Studies
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Bacchus, Zorina
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Special Individualized Program
Date:28 August 2013
Thesis Supervisor(s):Sujir, Leila
ID Code:977813
Deposited By: ZORINA BACCHUS
Deposited On:25 Nov 2013 17:18
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:45
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