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Transmedia Television: New Engagement Forms and Industry Practices

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Transmedia Television: New Engagement Forms and Industry Practices

Kaufman, Jordan (2014) Transmedia Television: New Engagement Forms and Industry Practices. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

The emergence of contemporary transmedia practices in network fictional television in the United States has worked to complicate our understanding of the television medium in the twenty-first century. As networks increasingly expand televisual content across new media technologies and various engagement platforms, this creates a series of organizational and creative changes both within the industry and daily experiences of televisions viewers. While transmedia research to date has tended to focus on defining the terminology and recounting early examples of transmedia experiments, this thesis shifts focus away from larger scale accounts of transmedia criticism to a more nuanced approach. To this end, transmedia television is situated within historical, contextual and methodological frameworks before moving on to a formal textual-based analysis of two case studies. These frameworks establish the research criteria and methodologies used to observe and evaluate the various tactics and strategies adopted in a successful TV website and second screen engagements that are the subject of the case studies. By engaging in a close analysis of these two examples of transmedia platforms, this thesis attempts to develop a fuller understanding of contemporary transmedia engagements in television, and contribute to establishing transmedia as an emerging medium in and of itself.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Fine Arts > Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Kaufman, Jordan
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Film Studies
Date:31 February 2014
Thesis Supervisor(s):Steinberg, Marc
Keywords:Transmedia, Cross-Media, Convergence, New Media, Second Screen, Television
ID Code:978416
Deposited By: JORDAN KAUFMAN
Deposited On:30 Jun 2014 15:12
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:46
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