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Non-monogamies and the space of discourse theorizing the intersections of non/monogamy and intimate privilege in the public sphere

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Non-monogamies and the space of discourse theorizing the intersections of non/monogamy and intimate privilege in the public sphere

Rambukkana, Nathan (2010) Non-monogamies and the space of discourse theorizing the intersections of non/monogamy and intimate privilege in the public sphere. PhD thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

This dissertation uses genealogical discourse analysis to unpack recent Western conceptions of monogamy and non-monogamy in the public sphere. Beginning from the premise that discourses surrounding monogamy and non-monogamy (taken together as a system of non/monogamy) have come into particular prominence in recent years, this dissertation deploys a thread of queer theory focused on the study of broader conceptions of "intimacy" to explore the ramifications of such a prominence in the public sphere. More specifically, drawing on theorizations of spatiality (Temporary Autonomous Zones, Mapping/Reterritorialization, Heterotopia) and the concept of "privilege", I formulate the theoretical lens of "intimate privilege" to explore how non/monogamy is distributed throughout, takes up, and creates forms of intimate space. In exploding the overly-simple notion that monogamous sexuality is societally privileged, while non-monogamies are marginalized, I show how while there is a societal meta-narrative that centres monogamy, it is really the intersectionality of non/monogamy with other forms of privilege/oppression that truly locates a subject practicing (or connected to) non-monogamous intimacy as having intimate privilege, defined as the emergent state in which one's intimacies hold societal privilege. Engaging in theoretical and discursive analyses of the contemporary public sphere presences of three major forms of non-monogamy (adultery, polygamy and polyamory) through texts such as journalistic articles, policy documents, self-help literature, television programs and Internet sites, I continue the academic discussion surrounding non-monogamies that is just beginning to come into its own in the fields of social science and humanities, as well as to complicate less-nuanced discourses on non/monogamy that are circulating more broadly in the public sphere.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Communication Studies
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Authors:Rambukkana, Nathan
Pagination:x, 300 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Ph. D.
Program:Communication Studies
Date:2010
Thesis Supervisor(s):Nadeau, C
ID Code:979343
Deposited By: Concordia University Library
Deposited On:09 Dec 2014 17:57
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:49
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