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Sex differences in the role of peer relationships in buffering victimized early adolescents from depressed affect

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Sex differences in the role of peer relationships in buffering victimized early adolescents from depressed affect

Doramajian, Caroline (2010) Sex differences in the role of peer relationships in buffering victimized early adolescents from depressed affect. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

The present study explored sex differences in the strength of several peer support measures as moderators of the association between peer victimization and depressed affect. Peer reports of depressed affect, victimization, and friendship were obtained from 430 early adolescents attending fifth or sixth grade (222 boys and 208 girls; mean age of 11 years). Peer acceptance was defined as the number of friendship nominations received from peers, with high scores suggesting a greater potential for interactions within a larger peer group. Mutual friendship was based on reciprocated first or second best friend choices and represents an exclusive dyadic peer experience. Friendship quality was assessed by asking participants to rate positive and negative features of their best friendships in order to gauge the content and provisions of close peer relationships. Structural equation modeling was conducted to determine the moderating effects of the peer support variables. Hypotheses were based on observed and conceptualized sex differences in peer relationship styles which suggest that girls have a greater preference for dyadic relationships while boys have a greater preference for larger peer group experiences. As expected, peer acceptance buffered the effects of victimization for boys but not for girls and having a mutual friend buffered the effects of victimization for girls but not for boys. High quality friendships were found to be equally protective for victimized boys and girls. Discerning such sex-linked moderating factors may contribute to the design and adaptation of interventions aimed at curbing the emerging prevalence of depression during adolescence.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Doramajian, Caroline
Pagination:vii, 73 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Psychology
Date:2010
Thesis Supervisor(s):Bukowski, W
ID Code:979375
Deposited By: Concordia University Library
Deposited On:09 Dec 2014 17:58
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:49
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