Login | Register

A Systematic Review of One-to-One Access to Laptop Computing in K-12 Classrooms: An Investigation of Factors that Influence Program Impact

Title:

A Systematic Review of One-to-One Access to Laptop Computing in K-12 Classrooms: An Investigation of Factors that Influence Program Impact

Bethel, Edward Clement (2015) A Systematic Review of One-to-One Access to Laptop Computing in K-12 Classrooms: An Investigation of Factors that Influence Program Impact. PhD thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
Bethel_PhD_S2015.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Spectrum Terms of Access.
3MB

Abstract

In 2005, Nicholas Negroponte stepped onto the stage at TED and challenged the audience: “What would happen if we gave every student a laptop computer?” Ten years later, and twenty-five years after the first laptop program, this dissertation attempts to answer that question using two systematic review procedures, case survey analysis and mixed effects meta-analysis. Literature searches and review resulted in 162 primary studies being included in the case survey of which 88 studies yielding 231 effect sizes and representing approximately 116,150 participants, were selected for the meta-analysis. The case survey analysis revealed that typically, programs were co-educational, involving public middle schools, and conducted at the board or district levels. Program theories, whether stated or inferred clustered around three main themes: technology-enhanced environments, technology-enhanced instruction, and computers as mind tools or learning tools. Program goals were numerous and varied, but centered on technology use and proficiency, achievement, questions of technology equity, and improved instruction. The meta-analysis revealed that one-to-one computing had an impact on five of the six outcomes tested: technology use (mean effect size 0.53), technology proficiency (0.29), student achievement (0.23), student engagement (0.15), and student satisfaction (0.26). Attendance was not significant (0.00). The general effects were moderated in expected and unexpected ways – technology use was moderated by program theory and year, technology proficiency was moderated by technology use and duration, and achievement was moderated by program size, participant age, program year, technology integration, duration, and teacher-centered instruction. Explanations were proposed for these findings, and new directions for future research outlined.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Education
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Authors:Bethel, Edward Clement
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Ph. D.
Program:Educational Technology
Date:16 February 2015
Thesis Supervisor(s):Bernard, Robert
Keywords:one-to-one, ubiquitous computing, laptop initiative, laptop computing, K-12, school, education, laptop, notebook, netbook, portable, technology integration, computers, evaluation, technology uses in education, computer uses in education, access to computers, computer assisted instruction, computer attitudes, computer literacy
ID Code:979773
Deposited By: EDWARD BETHEL
Deposited On:16 Jul 2015 14:56
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:49
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Back to top Back to top