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New Testament Texts on Greek Amulets from Late Antiquity and Their Relevance for Textual Criticism

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New Testament Texts on Greek Amulets from Late Antiquity and Their Relevance for Textual Criticism

Jones, Brice C. (2015) New Testament Texts on Greek Amulets from Late Antiquity and Their Relevance for Textual Criticism. PhD thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

This dissertation examines New Testament citations on all Greek papyrus and parchment amulets from late antique Egypt. Since New Testament textual criticism does not allow for the inclusion of non-continuous manuscripts (of which amulets are a part) in the official catalogue of manuscripts, a large body of textual evidence has fallen outside the purview of scholars. This dissertation, which constitutes the first systematic treatment of non-continuous manuscripts, seeks to remedy the situation in part by determining the ways in which New Testament texts on amulets may be useful for textual criticism.

This dissertation has three main objectives. The first objective is to define more closely the categories of continuous and non-continuous by formulating criteria for the identification of the latter. The second objective is to propose a method for analyzing the texts of non-continuous artifacts in terms of their text-critical value. The third objective is to establish a comprehensive database of one category of non-continuous artifacts (amulets) and provide a detailed analysis of both their texts and containers (i.e., physical manuscripts).

By analyzing a largely untapped source of New Testament textual data, this project contributes to a methodological question in textual criticism concerning its categories and provides a wealth of source material for the study of the reception of the Bible in early Christianity. Thus, while the study is targeted at textual critics, it contributes to a conversation about early Christianity that is much larger than the project, as these texts demonstrate the various ways in which early Christians used scripture.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Religions and Cultures
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Authors:Jones, Brice C.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Ph. D.
Program:Religion
Date:30 March 2015
Thesis Supervisor(s):Gagné, André
Keywords:amulets, greek, new testament, textual criticism
ID Code:979831
Deposited By: Brice Channing Jones
Deposited On:16 Jul 2015 15:44
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:50
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