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Exposing Celebrity Scandal: How Journalism, Fame, and Audiences Coincide.

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Exposing Celebrity Scandal: How Journalism, Fame, and Audiences Coincide.

Hanukov, Ilana (2015) Exposing Celebrity Scandal: How Journalism, Fame, and Audiences Coincide. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

This thesis explores the world of celebrity scandal, investigating what happens when journalists report on star transgressions that disrupt prevailing codes of behaviour. The central assertion of this thesis is that in circulating controversy, journalists ultimately strive not to inform or to educate the public, but rather to gain audiences and sell papers. The analysis, intertwining cultural and political-economic viewpoints, is guided by two overarching goals: to address the elements that give celebrity scandal its resonance within contemporary culture, and to clearly delineate how these elements are mobilized to reap the full economic benefits of scandal. Three case studies, involving Kate Moss, Lance Armstrong, and Charlie Sheen, are examined to expose the mutually dependent relationship between the key players in scandal stories: those reporting (journalists), those being reported on (celebrities), and those responding (audiences). Concentrating on what drives scandal news circuits and who benefits from these stories, this study aims to open the door to wider explorations of journalistic practices in times of controversy.

Divisions:Concordia University > School of Graduate Studies
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Hanukov, Ilana
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Journalism Studies
Date:27 May 2015
ID Code:980086
Deposited By: ILANA HANUKOV
Deposited On:28 Oct 2015 18:33
Last Modified:18 Jan 2018 17:50
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