Login | Register

Paved with Good Intentions: The Development of German and American Holocaust-era Looted Art Restitution Institutions

Title:

Paved with Good Intentions: The Development of German and American Holocaust-era Looted Art Restitution Institutions

Stokvis-Hauer, Alyssa (2018) Paved with Good Intentions: The Development of German and American Holocaust-era Looted Art Restitution Institutions. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
Stokvis-Hauer_MA_S2018.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Spectrum Terms of Access.
4MB

Abstract

Abstract
Paved with Good Intentions: The Development of German and American
Holocaust-era Looted Art Restitution Institutions

Alyssa Stokvis-Hauer

This thesis presents insights into how conceptualizing and pursuing Nazi-looted art and cultural heritage restitution has changed since 1945 in the United States and Germany. The text presents historical and institutional analyses of the two major restitution institutions in these countries; the New York Financial Service Department’s Holocaust Claims Processing Office (HCPO), and the Magdeburg-based federal institution known widely as the German Lost Art Foundation, or more correctly as the Deutsches Zentrum Kulturgutverluste, formerly the Koordinierungsstelle für Kulturgutverluste located first in Bremen and then Magdeburg.

The past views of guilt, justice, and restitution as a moral imperative in the years immediately following World War II vary substantially from the contemporary ethos that characterizes the restitution of Holocaust-era spoliated cultural objects. Through the 1940s and 1950s German suffering shaped post-war German imperatives, while the American approach was heavily influenced by media coverage which highlighted American heroism and virtue, alongside a reluctant custodianship balanced with efforts to engage in effective restitution prerogatives. As such, the ascendancy of moral purpose and a politics of memory and regret in the 1990s is a significant shift. Filling a gap in World War II era spoliated art restitution research, this text uses institutional and cultural comparisons to bring to the fore patterns and changes within national self-narration or identification that influence institutional organization or practices. Drawing from archival documents, interviews, and secondary literature, this shift is approached and analyzed through a framework of discursive institutionalism, collective memory, and national identity construction.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Fine Arts > Art History
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Stokvis-Hauer, Alyssa
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Art History
Date:January 2018
Thesis Supervisor(s):MacKenzie, Catherine
Keywords:Holocaust-era looted assets, Nazi looted art, spoliation, restitution, restitution policy, cultural property, cultural heritage, German history, American history, institutional analysis, ethics, Holocaust Claims Processing Office, Deutsches Zentrum Kulturgutverluste, Koordinierungsstelle für Kulturgutverluste, collective memory, national identity, World War II, Post-war restitution
ID Code:983428
Deposited By: ALYSSA HAUER
Deposited On:11 Jun 2018 01:07
Last Modified:11 Jun 2018 01:07
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
- Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
Back to top Back to top