Login | Register

The Elizabeths: Gender, Modernism, and Winnipeg’s Built Environment, 1945-1975

Title:

The Elizabeths: Gender, Modernism, and Winnipeg’s Built Environment, 1945-1975

Gruwel, Marieke (2019) The Elizabeths: Gender, Modernism, and Winnipeg’s Built Environment, 1945-1975. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

[img]
Preview
Text (application/pdf)
Gruwel_MA_F2019.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Spectrum Terms of Access.
5MB

Abstract

This thesis examines the careers of Elizabeth M. Lord (born Crawford, 1918-1994) and Elizabeth M. Pilcher (later Causwell, 1920-1991?), two women architects who worked in Winnipeg, Manitoba during the post-war period. Lord received her Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Manitoba in 1939 and, in 1944, became the first woman to register with the Manitoba Association of Architects. For the majority of her career, Lord ran her own architectural practice in Winnipeg, taking on small-scale, often domestic, projects. Pilcher received her Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Sydney in 1945. She went on to complete studies at Harvard University and the Edinburgh College of Art. In December 1958, Pilcher arrived in Winnipeg to accept a position with the prominent architectural firm Green Blankstein Russell as chief of their planning department. Given the differences between Lord and Pilcher, the thesis asks: what can be learned about Winnipeg’s built environment during the post-war period by looking at the lives and work of these two women architects? Grounded in empirical evidence, the thesis uses biography as a method to build a picture of Lord and Pilcher’s contributions to post-war construction in Winnipeg. The thesis positions Lord and Pilcher within the history of women architects in Canada and within the climate of the architectural profession in Winnipeg. Fundamentally recuperative in nature, the thesis takes a feminist approach to the history of Winnipeg’s built environment and demonstrates how Lord and Pilcher were active agents who created a lasting mark on the built landscape of their city.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Fine Arts > Art History
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Gruwel, Marieke
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:M.A.
Program:Art History
Date:August 2019
Thesis Supervisor(s):Hammond, Cynthia
ID Code:985702
Deposited By: Marieke Gruwel
Deposited On:14 Nov 2019 15:24
Last Modified:14 Nov 2019 15:24
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads per month over past year

Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
- Research related to the current document (at the CORE website)
Back to top Back to top