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Can genetic justice survive? : DNA technology and social control in the 21st century

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Can genetic justice survive? : DNA technology and social control in the 21st century

Huggins, Rachel (2000) Can genetic justice survive? : DNA technology and social control in the 21st century. Masters thesis, Concordia University.

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Abstract

DNA technology will impact many areas in society and has been swept up by some members of the criminal justice system as a tool to aid in the "war against crime". As a fairly recent innovative technology DNA evidence has found a place within the state's contemporary process of crime control. This science has not only transformed crime control but has offered the criminal justice system a method of social control that relies on our genetic make-up, is highly accurate, but includes an invasion of privacy right. This study is a theoretical trend analysis of how the criminal justice system has shifted from a human-based to a science-based system of crime control, and how DNA technology has encouraged the process. The issues addressed include ideologies relied upon by the criminal justice system (in United States, United Kingdom and Canada) to promote, regulate and determine the use of DNA technology, and the publics reaction to what some call an invasive technology. DNA technology like many other technologies, can sometimes be a double-edged sword: there are benefits and adverse affects to society when DNA technology is used for crime control. There is also a potential for misuse of this technology and abuse by those who should be protecting not only societal interest as defined by government, but the privacy interest and rights to fair and equal justice on the part of all citizens.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Sociology and Anthropology
Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Authors:Huggins, Rachel
Pagination:v, 121 leaves ; 29 cm.
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Theses (M.A.)
Program:Sociology and Anthropology
Date:2000
Thesis Supervisor(s):Gerlach, Neil
ID Code:1180
Deposited By:Concordia University Libraries
Deposited On:27 Aug 2009 13:17
Last Modified:08 Dec 2010 10:19
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