Breadcrumb

 
 

Risk Factors for Hypertension in a Black Canadian Population: Stress, Cardiovascular Reactivity, Cardiovascular Recovery, Gender, Dietary Sodium, Ambulatory Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure Dipping, Anger Expression, and Perceived Racism

Title:

Risk Factors for Hypertension in a Black Canadian Population: Stress, Cardiovascular Reactivity, Cardiovascular Recovery, Gender, Dietary Sodium, Ambulatory Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure Dipping, Anger Expression, and Perceived Racism

Saunders, Saneeta (2012) Risk Factors for Hypertension in a Black Canadian Population: Stress, Cardiovascular Reactivity, Cardiovascular Recovery, Gender, Dietary Sodium, Ambulatory Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure Dipping, Anger Expression, and Perceived Racism. PhD thesis, Concordia University.

[img]PDF - Accepted Version
2172Kb

Abstract

The present study investigated the effects of gender, sodium, anger-in, and perceived racism, on cardiovascular reactivity and recovery from laboratory stressors, ambulatory sleep and wake measures, and nocturnal blood pressure dipping. Fifty-three healthy Canadian Black male and female university students participated in a 21-day experimental protocol. Participants were twice exposed to three laboratory stressors tasks, and twice underwent 24-hr ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, at the end of a 10-day regular and a 10-day sodium-loaded diet period, respectively. Cardiovascular measures were recorded at baseline, pre-stress, during the stressor, and post-stress during the recovery period. Self-report measures on anger expression and perceived racism were collected. No effect of sodium on cardiovascular reactivity was found. Marginal findings implicate an interaction between sodium and gender on cardiovascular recovery from stress, and an effect of sodium on nocturnal blood pressure dipping. Gender differences were found for patterns in cardiovascular reactivity to stress, and for ambulatory heart rate measures. No significant findings emerged for effects of anger-in; however an interaction between gender and anger-out on blood pressure dipping is implicated. A significant interaction between gender, stressor type, and perceived racism was found for cardiovascular recovery from stress. Implications of these findings for future research on risk for development of hypertension in the Canadian Black population are discussed.

Divisions:Concordia University > Faculty of Arts and Science > Psychology
Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Authors:Saunders, Saneeta
Institution:Concordia University
Degree Name:Ph. D.
Program:Psychology
Date:September 2012
Thesis Supervisor(s):Miller, S.
ID Code:974665
Deposited By:SANEETA SAUNDERS
Deposited On:31 Oct 2012 09:48
Last Modified:31 Oct 2012 09:48
All items in Spectrum are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved. The use of items is governed by Spectrum's terms of access.

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...

Concordia University - Footer